The Mystery of ROI for SEO Campaigns

ROI imageThis blog used to attract a lot of visitors and then due to circumstances beyond my control I had to shut it down for almost a year. When I was finally able to bring the blog back to life a large portion of the traffic was lost, various popularity rankings were down, and I realized that restarting would be even more complex than what I had to go through when starting from scratch a few years ago.

I had to undergo many pains including inevitable investment in SEO, a potential bottomless money pit, and the first question on my mind was its financial impact, budget I need to allocate, and the ROI to expect.

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5 Traps of So Called Cost Effective SEO

5-traps-of-cost-effective-seoIf being found on the web is essential for you or your business, you are probably no stranger to Search Engine Optimization (SEO). SEO, an extremely complex and comprehensive set of activities, has become a major component of marketing strategies for most companies today, and a source of revenue for countless (offshore) SEO providers.

For most businesses SEO is not their core activity and that makes SEO a good prospect for outsourcing. Also many aspects of SEO are somewhat mechanical and labor intensive, so it’s no surprise that many companies elect to outsource SEO. With a large number of SEO providers out there the cost of it is alluringly low.

However, cheap outsourced SEO is not the brightest idea you can try; chances are you will “get what you paid for”, and often even less. Paying just a few hundreds of dollars per month for someone to handle your SEO efforts is likely to be a complete waste of money. As the common saying tells, if something sounds too good to be true, then it most probably is. Here are 5 potential traps to think about whenever you are assaulted with promises of boosting your Google rank overnight: Continue reading

Five Ways to Screw Up Your Content Outsourcing

regret-nohingAs our world becomes increasingly virtual, and therefore more connected, more and more companies are considering content outsourcing for a variety of tasks. This can be a truly great decision for any company, but there are also plenty of ways to screw it up.

For example, a client of mine decided to outsource his company’s blog. He hired a few providers on eLance and moved forward without establishing expectations for quality and even without defining when the work should be delivered. It turned into a complete nightmare after months went by with very few acceptable blog posts. Eventually my friend had to find a new writer. That put his company months behind schedule to meet their viewership goals. In fact, they ended up losing many of their existing followers due to the slowdown in content publishing.

Nothing like that ever happened to you? Maybe something similar? Well, here are five ways you can be guaranteed to screw up your content outsourcing:

Don’t take the time to identify what you really need. Before even beginning the process of outsourcing, you need to identify what it is that you need. Use S.M.A.R.T. approach to identify objectives and criteria for success. If you don’t know exactly what you are looking for, it will be impossible to find the perfect person/company for the job.

Don’t do your due diligence. Take the time to research the provider. Ask for examples of their past work. Have them provide references. And spend the time necessary to find out if they really have the skills and knowledge required to do the job well.

Don’t set up clear expectations. Before your new provider ever begins working for you, you need to set up clear expectations. Your S.M.A.R.T. objectives will coma handy at this point. Have specific tasks and milestones for when the work needs to be completed or sent in for review. Miscommunication of expectations can easily kill what could have turned out to be a fantastic relationship.

Don’t get guarantees. Have a contract with your provider that clearly establishes what is expected and that offers guarantees of the quality of work that should be delivered. This helps protect both of you.

Don’t get buy in from everyone. Unless you are a sole proprietor, you likely have at least a few other decision makers that need to be consulted before making a decision regarding outsourcing. In order for outsourcing to be successful you have to receive buy in from all of the people that have a major stake in the outcome.

What do you do to ensure your content outsourcing success? What have been your failures? Or successes? Please share your personal stories and suggestions in the comments below or send me an email at krym2000-po@yahoo.com.