It’s Not Over, Till It’s Over

I was fairly certain that an offshore development company with majority of their staff in St. Petersburg, Russia was the best choice for a large scale initiative for my company. The decision came after complex vendor selection process which included on-site visits, marathon interviews, long and pricy MSA negotiations, etc.

I hang up the phone after final discussion with the CEO and smiled. I liked the team in Russia, some of the guys I met there were at par with my best developers in-house, I was happy with the location as it was offering a cure for my nostalgia, and I was proud to be able to deal with the biggest obstacle I faced on the day one of the negotiations – substantially higher rates of developers in Russia comparing to those in India.

“Why work with India if you can find more expensive developers somewhere else?” is not exactly the question you want to be discussing with BoD or your executives. My convoluted negotiation scheme has paid off. I was quite happy with what I was able to squeeze out of the vendor. There were only a few formalities to take care off and I would move forward with the project.

I have t ell you – having had set my eyes on the Russian vendor I had to stick my neck out a great deal. There were plenty of concerns with outsourcing in my organization to begin with, moving it to Russia was a challenge of a much high caliber. “If the creator had a purpose in equipping us with a neck, he surely meant us to stick it out.” [Arthur Koestler] Those are the words to live by. I was selling idea of using the Russian team as there was no tomorrow. My efforts were paying off on that side as well – I had full support of my executive team and was ready to move forward with the contract and a very hefty budget.

Next day I was on my way to LA, long weekend offered a perfect break from the grueling selection process and contract negotiations. I was in a wonderful mood and almost all the way through the 10 hour trip when I got a call from my vendor’s CEO. For some reason he decided to speak in English: “Nick, my board of directors has reviewed all the details of the contract and after much discussions had made the decision to withdraw our proposal and exit the negotiations.” I said something borderline polite, hang up the phone, and issued a very loud, long and very politically incorrect tirade…

Funny enough things worked out to the best, the vendor that was awarded the contract instead of the Russian team in many respects offered a better match, stronger skills and less time difference… Plus, I added a few more notes to my bag of tricks, tips and traps:

  • Never come to the finish line of selection process with a single vendor in mind. Make sure that your short list has at least two, better three capable companies.
  • Do not rely on your intuition (bias, preferences, etc.) when selecting the vendor; let the facts, spreadsheets and team consensus drive the decision.
  • Do not oversell your team, company, and execs on the benefits of outsourcing and especially on any specific vendor. Remember no matter how low you set the expectations your offshore vendor will easily fail them.
  • Do not get lost in complex gambits and convoluted negotiation schemas.
  • And the most important, do not try to pay the vendor less than they can generally get in the open market.

The last bullet deserves special attention as a fair rate is a moving target and depends on many aspects and circumstances. I guess that will be my next post.

One thought on “It’s Not Over, Till It’s Over

  1. > And the most important, do not try to pay the vendor less than they can generally get in the open market.

    Everybody needs to make money, so this is indeed really bad practice. You will probably get what you pay for anyway: juniors, less peole than you think or lot’s of team changes.

    In my opinion an important part of offshoring is providing the offshore people a good salary for the work they do… and, by doing so, investing in the local economy, which often needs it.

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